Tamland 1
4 reviews.

Tamland 1

Availability: In stock

$1,799.99

$1,439.99

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Tamland 1

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Ready for the discerning commuter who morphs into a gravel racer come the weekend, the Tamland 1 is a modern take on classic steel. Made with geometry that inspires confidence in deep, loose gravel or dirt, the versatile Tamland 1 allows you to go where most bikes can't, but also offers the flexibility to ride in complete comfort as a higher end commuter bike.

The Tamland 1 is made with an extremely strong, responsive Reynolds 631 Chromoly frame reducing the harsh realities of the road, and the carbon fork makes steering feel light and easy. To take on all kinds of conditions, the Tamland 1 features mechanical disc brakes with great stopping power in inclement weather and thru axles on front and rear for a more responsive and safe ride. Shimano 105 ST-5800 shifters offer 22 gears to choose from and drop bars bring out the racer in any rider. Clement Strada USH 700×32c tires roll on U28 tubeless ready rims. For a versatile gravel race and commuter bike with great ride characteristics, you can't go wrong with the Tamland 1.

Frame Reynolds 631 Chromoly Custom Butted, Disc
Fork Carbon/Alloy Tapered Steer, Post Mount Disc, 15mm Thru Axles
Headset Integrated Cartridge Bearings
Cranks Forged 2PC Compact 34/46t
Bottom Bracket External Bearing
Front Derailleur Shimano 105 FD-5800
Rear Derailleur Shimano 105 RD-5800, 11spd
Shifter Shimano 105 ST-5800, 11spd
Cogset Shimano CS-5800 11spd (11-32t)
Chain KMC X11
Front Hub Alloy Disc, 15mm Thru Axle, 32h
Rear Hub Alloy Disc, Thru Axle, 32h
Spokes 14g Stainless MAC w/Alloy Nipples
Rims Weinmann U28 TL, Double Wall 32h
Tires Clement Strada USH, 700x32c, 60TPI Folding
Brakes TRP Spyre Mechanical dual actuated disc, 160mm Rotors
Brake Levers Shimano 105
Pedals Test Ride Pedals
Handlebar Raleigh 200 series 31.8 with 12 Degree Flare, 38/40/42/44
Stem Raleigh 3D Forged, 31.8, Lengths:90/90/100/100/110/110mm
Seat Raleigh series Saddle w/Chromoly rail
Seatpost Raleigh 6061 Alloy Dual Bolt 27.2x350mm
Extras Rack and Fender Mounts, third bottle cage mount.
Tape Raleigh AllCondition Tape
Bike Weight 24.23 lbs
Bike size 52CM / Rider Height: 5'4"-5'7" 54CM / Rider Height: 5'7" - 5'9" 56CM / Rider Height: 5'9" - 5'11" 58cm / Rider Height: 5'11" - 6'0" 60cm / Rider Height: 6'0" - 6'3" 62cm / Rider Height: 6'3" - 6'5"
Seat Tube Length 490mm 510mm 530mm 550mm 570mm 590mm
Stand Over Height 772mm 791mm 807mm 829mm 845mm 862mm
Top Tube Length 525mm 545mm 560mm 575mm 590mm 605mm
Stack 558mm 566mm 581mm 599mm 613mm 628mm
Reach 370mm 372mm 383mm 386mm 397mm 407mm
Head Tube Length 125mm 145mm 160mm 175mm 195mm 210mm
Head Angle 71° 71.5° 71.5° 71.5° 71.5° 71.5°
Seat Angle 74.5° 73° 73° 72.5° 72.5° 72.5°
Wheel Base 1024mm 1028mm 1043mm 1049mm 1064mm 1080mm
Chain Stay Length 440mm 440mm 440mm 440mm 440mm 440mm
Fork Offset 52mm 52mm 52mm 52mm 52mm 52mm
BB Height 77.5mm 75mm 75mm 72.5mm 72.5mm 72.5mm
Stem Length 90mm 90mm 100mm 100mm 110mm 110mm
Handlebar Width 40mm 42mm 42mm 44mm 44mm 44mm
Crank Length 170mm 172.5mm 172.5mm 175mm 175mm 175mm
Seat Post Length

Customer Reviews Write Your Own

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Love this bike! 2000 mile update

Review by James
Overall Quality

After 2000 miles still love this bike. Rode the GAP trail with panniers and trunk bag, bike is really at home on dirt rail trails. Brought the bike on a family vacation caching rides in several midwest states as well as extensive rides in New Mexico and Arizona. Loose sand roads need tires wider than 32c but everyone knows that. Bike has room for 40+ tires so will go that way when these Strada's wear out

I was forced to replace the crappy rear hub. The bearings just would not stay in adjustment and for some odd reason it regularly broke rear spokes at the nipple. Using the stock rim I built a new wheel with Wheelsmith DB spokes, proper brass nipples and a Bitex hub with sealed bearings. Probably should have gone 36 spokes but the rim is actually pretty nice. Have about 500 miles on the new wheel with no more issues. I prefer building my own wheels so did not attempt a warranty claim.

(Posted on 8/19/2017)

Just all around fantastic.

Review by James McG
Overall Quality

This is my first road bike and I seem to have picked a winner. I did a lot of reading before hand and I was dead set on the Tamland, it hasn't disappointed! For the most part the parts spec is awesome for the price. I did however change the seat post and saddle. Saddle for comfort, seat post for the fact I couldn't get the bolts to stop creaking/cracking under load.

In any case I'd re-buy this bike in a heartbeat, and have no issues recommending it to people.

(Posted on 7/5/2017)

Love this bike!

Review by James
Overall Quality

Man, I love this bike. Got it 3 months ago and weather is just now allowing some serious rides, but really happy so far. I have found the bike to be everything the reviews say it is. I’m not sure what a slack geometry is but the bike is a very stable ride. It is slower to snap around unexpected pot holes or rocks than my road bike but also much less twitchy at speed. The bike is surprisingly fast on downhills, I coasted past a recumbent yesterday. On rough stone packed roads the bike really soaks up the vibration, much smoother than my aluminum framed hardtail with front suspension and carbon handle bars. Maybe there is something to this steel frame voodoo.

Bought the bike to ride rail trails with a C&O canal-GAP ride planned this spring. Now that I am 58 I needed a bike with lower gears, just can’t push the big cogs like I did 20 years ago. Am also thinking about distance touring post retirement, so something durable and repairable in the field. I was looking an aluminum frame bikes with full hydro brakes, but when Rayleigh dropped the discount price on a 2017 Tamland 1 delivered I couldn’t pass it up.

The 56 cm bike was the right fit for my 5’11” 220# body. I did flip the stem over to get the bars higher for a more upright ride. Still might opt for a 10-20 mm shorter stem once I get more miles in.

Assembly was uneventful, although a half page of instruction specific to this bike on installing the front brake caliper and cable routing would have been appreciated. The brakes themselves were trivial to set up: just apply the brakes to center them when tightening the mounting bolts, get the pads close when securing the cable than a half turn or so on the cable tension adjuster till there was a paper thin bit of light between them and the rotors. Done. The mechanical discs seem very capable, although not quite as smooth as the XT hydros on my suspension bike. I did order some semi-metallic pads to carry as backups and ended up putting them on the front only to balance out the braking effort a bit. 220# requires a good bit of stopping power. Jagwire cables were a nice touch, they are all I use anymore.

The 105 components are everything people say they are. Took me two rides up and down the my street to dial them in. Haven’t touched an adjustment or missed a shift since. The suckers just work, click-click-click. Was happy to discover the new brifters have an adjustment to bring them closer to the bars, so unlike older units no shims needed to adjust them for my stubby hands.

The wider handle bars felt weird at first, but after a couple of rides felt so good I got wider bars for my road bike. This might be part of reason the bike seems so stable at speed. I even like the bar tape, pretty weird. Saddle is a Rayleigh unit that I plan to keep.

Being as big as I am I wanted the 32 spoke wheels and like the fact the rims are reported to be durable. Might upgrade to 36 spoke rear if I do any extensive touring. The through axle hubs and crankset are truly no-name units, not a designer label anywhere, so you won’t impress your friends with those. Only time will tell if that matters. The BB bearings are external so hopefully some longevity there. The 32c Clement Strada tires definitely roll with little resistance on pavement. Haven’t tried them in loose sand or mud yet. Would have preferred the wider 40c tires of the older models but tires get replaced often enough.

Read a review that said the carbon front forks were mediocre. Not sure what to say about that, maybe they are, this is the first carbon forked bike I have ridden, but they aren’t mediocre for the reason the reviewer stated. True the front of the forks is a straight as a pencil. I see that on quite a few other bikes as well. But these have a good bit of rake: the front axle is an inch or two in front of the head tube axis. A good rake combined with such a complex taper on the back side tells me they were engineered to hinge and suck up vibration. At any rate the bike unquestionably does not “directly communicate every little pebble”. In my experience it does an excellent job of dampening road vibration, better than my aluminum frame front suspension bike. Hitting a 1 inch curb with tires at full 60 psi pressure without hopping the front end does transfer a pretty good jolt, but the bike just eats up in the saddle riding on cobblestones or busted up concrete.

(Posted on 3/26/2017)

Fantastic frame, groupset. Mediocre wheels and fork.

Review by Geoff
Overall Quality

I purchased the 2017 Tamland 1 in late 2016, soon after it was available from my LBS. I've now put about 1,200 miles on the bike including three gravel grinder races and feel qualified to make some initial comments.

First: the frame on this bike is wonderful. Maybe not the prettiest welding ever done, but the geometry and tubing choices are well made. It's shockingly smooth over rough surfaces. I can feel it give a bit when sprinting or climbing out of the saddle, but I don't feel it takes away from the effort. Compared to a stiff carbon frame, you feel the bike frame working with you through a difficult climb. Even bombing gravely descents, the rear stays planted and smooth. The geometry makes for a very stable ride. It's easy to keep the bike on a line, but no trouble to avoid a hole or obstacle in the way. In short: this is all the frame most cyclists might ever need. Perfectly capable and well behaved on or off road in absolutely any condition.

The 105 groupset is flawless. I upgraded from a bike running 105 5600 and this new group is a revelation. Incredibly good, particularly the front derailleur shifting. The Tamland came with a great Jagwire kit from the factory, a very nice touch. The TRP Spyre disc brakes are fantastic. They modulate well and give confidence in technical downhill sections. They're also easy to service on the side of the road. A couple of letdowns in the groupset - the crankset is some off brand deal. It feels cheaply built and a big step down from standard 105 cranks. Also, the rear cassette is a Sunrace instead of a 105. Easy enough to change, but still a bit disappointing to see back there on a new bike.

The two biggest weaknesses on the bike are the wheels and the fork. The rims aren't too bad. They seem sturdy and well made but are very heavy. The hubs also seem poorly made. No amount of adjustment seems to get them perfectly smooth. I've had some bad luck with my freehub and am already hunting a replacement. I appreciate what they tried to do with the width, but would rather have a narrower, lighter wheel. The wheels let the bike down and are something you'll want to replace.

The fork is, in my opinion, the weakest point on the bike. While the steel frame smooths out the rear end, the straight legged carbon fork seems to directly communicate every little pebble right up to the handlebars. I appreciate what they're trying to do with weight savings here, but I'd trade a pound on the fork for a bit more smoothness.

While this is clearly no "Sunday Screamer", this is a fantastic bike for many purposes. Equally adept at fast centuries on pavement or gravel, able to fit fenders and racks, geared well for carrying a load up a hill, and with extremely stable geometry. This bike is well thought built and thought out. If you're looking for a "one bike to rule them all" this comes pretty close. The Tamland is perfectly capable of doing whatever it is you want to do on a bicycle.

(Posted on 3/18/2017)

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